Book Review: The Devil Wears Prada, by Laura Weisberger

devil_wears_pradaHow would you feel if you got the job that a million girls would kill for, but you have a rude boss expecting you to fail? What would you do in the situation? At first Andrea Sachs was strong, but will these fashionable, uptight people get to her? In 2003 Lauren Weisberger wrote her first book, The Devil Wears Prada. The story became a best seller and a movie was made about the book. This book was about her own life experience with Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour.

This story takes place in New York City, at a fashion magazine called Runway Magazine where Andrea works. Andrea Sachs is a hardworking girl who’s willing to do whatever it takes for her job. Andrea isn’t the most fashionable person and right when she steps foot in the office people start judging her. The boss Miranda Priestly judges her too, but she decides to give her a chance and hire Andrea as her new assistant. “The caller ID confirmed my worst fear: it was Her. Miranda Priestly. My boss” (9). Miranda gives her a very hard time, but Andrea keeps working hard to get what she came here for. Andrea starts acting different to her friends and boyfriend. Then she changes her whole look and personality. Now she’s just like everyone else in the office; rude, uptight, and stuck up. Will she lose those closest to her? Or will she have to quit her job?

This story is full of conflicts. The main conflict is that her boss always judges her and tries to make her fail. She tries to make her fail by giving her difficult tasks to do and making fun of her clothes. Also, she changes herself from her new clothes to her new ego. Her friends hate this new Andrea. Her boyfriend and her friends start slipping away, so now all she has is her job. “Yes, the hours are long and the work is tough, but it’s incredibly glamorous and a million girls would die to do it” (25). Will Andrea give up and quite her job to win her friends back?

There are three main themes in this book. First is independence because she is very indecent and tries to stay that way but her surrounds change that. Second is stressed and anger because Miranda is always on her case about everything. Andrea just feels stressed and angry about her job and her boss. She tries to ignore that and just work hard to get everything done. Lastly I choose feeling out of place because Andrea is like the rest of the girls in the office. She isn’t tall and skinny and she doesn’t wear designer clothes. Andrea feels awkward and weird when everyone gives her mean looks. So Andrea feels very out of place whenever she’s around these people.

In conclusion this book was very good. At first it was a little slow, but after that it’s very good. I suggest this to all girls in their teens. It’s a book about independence, perseverance, and fashion. This is a great book for girls who want to work for the fashion industry. This is good for girls to read, because it shows them that they have to work very hard to get what they want in life. Lastly they have to be willing to do whatever it takes.

-Gwen H., 7th grade

 

5 thoughts on “Book Review: The Devil Wears Prada, by Laura Weisberger

  1. This is an excellent review! I love how you started off with some questions for the readers and get us involved! You definitely summarized up the entire novel, giving readers a real look at what the novel is all about.
    For me, I started reading this book about a year ago and gave up on it. Like you said, it does start off pretty slow and I’m typically into fast-paced, action-packed novels. But after reading your blog, I just might be interested in picking it up one last time!
    Keep up the good work & thanks for the super informative summary!:)

  2. I really loved this movie! Meryl Streep was a fabulous Miranda Priesly, and Anne Hathaway rocked the role of Andrea Saches; but I had never thought of reading the book until now! 🙂 After reading your review, I am definitely putting The Devil Wears Prada on my summer reading list!!
    Great review!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s