Book Review: Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell

gone_with_the_windSet in mid-nineteenth century Georgia, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind is one of the most unforgettable stories of all time.

A charming and obstinate sixteen-year-old girl, Scarlett O’Hara is the belle of the County. Like the rest of the South, she is used to a pampered lifestyle, where slaves wait on her twenty-four hours a day. All she does is dream about Ashley Wilkes, the man who she is madly in love with. When the Civil War begins, Scarlett and the rest of the South must give up their spoiled lives. At the same time, however, she must win Ashley’s heart and fight to survive one of the most brutal wars in American history.

Gone with the Wind is not just a story about love; it is also a very informative book that teaches readers many valuable lessons. Scarlett stayed strong and fought bravely throughout the war. Her conduct teaches readers determination, perseverance, and optimism. In order to survive, she gave up her old life and even picked cotton like a slave. Because of this, she learned to appreciate what she had in life, although she eventually became greedy because of fear.

As the book goes on, readers will become attached to the many characters, including the headstrong Scarlett and the sardonic Rhett. In my opinion, Scarlett is a spoiled, greedy brat who doesn’t care about anything except herself and money. I thought Scarlett got what she deserved when Rhett mocked her all those times and when the town treated her like an outcast. However, I still felt a connection to Scarlett, and actually felt sorry for her at the end of the story.

I thoroughly enjoyed Gone with the Wind, and it will always be one of the greatest classics of all time. As the Chicago Tribune says, Gone with the Wind is “fascinating and unforgettable! A remarkable book, a spectacular book, a book that will not be forgotten!”

-Kaylie W., 9th grade

3 thoughts on “Book Review: Gone with the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell

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