Series Review: Delirium, by Lauren Oliver

delirium_seriesI wrote a blog a couple of months ago about author Lauren Oliver’s visit to the Mission Viejo Library, which was absolutely phenomenal. It was a great opportunity to meet the author of a really prestigious series. While I was there, I received a free copy of the final novel in her Delirium series, Requiem. This series was absolutely marvelous. I have read a lot of novels, but this is definitely going to remain my favorite for a long time.

This series is about a girl, Lena Haloway, who lives in a world where love, or deliria, is a disease. In this world, when you turn 18, you get cured from deliria, and you get assigned a husband and a job for the rest of your life. There is a community of “Invalids” beyond the border of Portland, Maine, that are individuals who have never been cured of deliria. However, Lena Haloway’s life takes a turn for the unwanted.

Soon, before her cure day, Lena meets a perplexing boy named Alex, who she soon develops feelings for. A budding romance flourishes, however Lena is coming closer and closer to her cure day.

In this uniquely written novel series, Lauren Oliver puts her readers through a rollercoaster of an unwanted life in a different world.

-Nirmeet B., 10th grade

3 thoughts on “Series Review: Delirium, by Lauren Oliver

  1. Remarkable series; magnificent author.
    This series made my Favorite Bookshelf.
    I agree. Lauren Oliver was a truly amazing author to be able to meet in person, and I thoroughly enjoyed hearing her speak regarding the trilogy.
    Not only do her books assess some very proverbial, philosophical, and controversial subject matters, but they additionally have incredibly well interpreted characterization, plot development, and world-building. It was these things, I think, that made for such a great series.
    I think I read the series in two days. So much for making it last, huh?  But that just shows how fantastic of a series it really is.

    “Love: a single word, a wispy thing, a word no bigger or longer than an edge. That’s what it is: an edge; a razor. It draws up through the center of your life, cutting everything in two. Before and after. The rest of the world falls away on either side.” -Chapter 18

    “Sometimes I feel as though there are two me’s, one coasting directly on top of the other: the superficial me, who nods when she’s supposed to nod and says what she’s supposed to say, and some other, deeper part, the part that worries and dreams… Most of the time they move along in sync and I hardly notice the split, but sometimes it feels as though I’m two whole different people and I could rip apart at any second.” Delirium page 50

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