Reversion the Return: Chapter 3 game review

Reversion the Return: Chapter Three, produced by 3f Interactive, is a new and exciting story and role-playing game. The players follow the familiar protagonist, Christian, who is working with his fellow revolutionists to try and defeat the evil warlord Sergio from taking over his beautiful homeland, Buenos Aires. The game uses a simple but classic point and click playstyle, usually with inventory and puzzle-based missions. The game also uses incredible interactive voice acting as well as a hint system, for when the player is stuck. On top of that, the game’s 2d original aesthetics and challenging puzzles keep the players wanting more and more of the game

The characters themselves are very impressive. From friendly, peaceful citizens, to harsh, dangerous soldiers, the possibility is endless. This large amount of adversaries keeps the game interesting, as well as challenging. I still really enjoyed the live voice acting and performance of all the characters, and I felt that it gave each character a personality and personage. On top of that, each new environment and characters were individually drawn out and customized, based off of their personality.

The objective itself is very simple. The player must explore different parts of Buenos Aires in order to complete certain objectives. These objectives can range in simplicity and difficulty, such as the starting mission that requires you to remember a certain math equation, to one of the final objectives that require you to find and rescue your friend who was abducted by an evil military group. At times, these objectives can be tricky and confusing. At one point I was stuck for a good 30 minutes trying to find who I needed to talk too in one of the stealth missions.

To help counter these problems, the player is given the hint tool. This allows the player to receive a certain amount of hints, that will help them progress further in the level. Keep in mind that there are only a certain amount of hints that the player receives at the start of the mission, and after they use them all they must wait a certain amount of time for the hints to recharge. This system allows for the perfect amount of help to be given, while still keeping the game fun and challenging.

Overall, I enjoyed Reversion the Return: Chapter Three, produced by 3f Interactive. The simple but yet classic single-player story game really was nostalgic for me, especially since those were the types of games I used to play when I was younger.  The only thing I would improve upon is the diversity of the missions. I found that some of the missions were somewhat repetitive, so the game could become boring at some points. If the developers could somehow add a multiplayer aspect into this game, the possibilities would be endless. Besides that minor improvement, I really enjoyed Reversion the Return: Chapter Three and would recommend any puzzle-loving gamer to try it out. My overall rating of the game is it an 8.5 out of 10.

-Daniel C.

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

From the author of the well-known The Three Musketeers comes The Count of Monte Cristo, a classic tale of romance, adventure, and overarching revenge.

In 1815, Edmond Dantès, a talented sailor on the cusp of marriage, finds his golden life stolen away from him when he is cruelly betrayed by his supposed comrades. Branded a traitor and sentenced to life in prison, Dantès, innocent and heartbroken, has no idea the scale of the conspiracy presented against him. Of the three co-conspirators, all were considered the unfortunate man’s “friends”: M. Danglars, a fellow sailor who was desirous of supplanting Dantès as captain of their ship; M. Fernand, who loved the woman Dantès was to marry; and M. de Villefort, who ignored his duty as a man of law and sent a faultless young man to prison to protect his murderous father.

However easily they may have gotten away with their crime in round one, they certainly did not keep up their success in round two. After spending fourteen years in prison for a crime he did not commit, Edmond Dantès sets himself at liberty, and returns to France as the enigmatic Count of Monte Cristo, the man everyone knows yet no one does.

Receiving wealth beyond belief from a fellow inmate, the count, tenacious and patient, not only avails himself of the opportunity to exact revenge on the malicious men he blindly trusted, he also uses his immense wealth and munificence to benefit the lives of those who helped him in the past.

In the midst of all this, however, life goes on, and romantic intrigues, marriage refusals, and the like all continue on in the background of a slow-moving chess game only the Count of Monte Cristo knows is being played.

Mind racing, excitement overtaking, any reader, no matter what genre they prefer to read, will root for the vengeful Count of Monte Cristo, and condemn his enemies to their given punishments.

-Mahak M. 

The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas is available for checkout from the Mission Viejo Library. It is also available to download for free from Overdrive

The Copper Gauntlet by Cassandra Clare and Holly Black

The second book in the Magisterium series picks up where the first left off. Summer vacation is almost finished, and Call is looking forward to going back to school, although his dad is dead set against it. About a couple of weeks before school starts, Call learns that Alistair knows something about him that he is prepared to take desperate measures to correct (the same secret that was revealed at the end of The Iron Trial).

Once he gets to school, Call realizes that his dad is up to something when it’s rumored that someone is trying to steal the Alkahest, a powerful copper gauntlet.  Everyone thinks that the perpetrator is intending to harm the Makar and destroy the Magisterium. Call, though, knows better. He sets out to save his dad with Aaron, Tamara, Jasper, and Havoc, which turns out to have pretty unexpected results as they uncover secrets kept from even the mages.

There is quite a bit of character development, especially regarding Call. He has changed since the first book, although he still retains his characteristic personality. Call struggles with himself now more than he had in The Iron Trial, especially now that he can detect all the signs about who he really is, while at the same time kind of being in denial about it. However, he does carry himself differently and becomes more confident than the first book, and is more open than he used to be, although he doesn’t always go to his friends for help when he needs it.

-Aliya A.

The Copper Gauntlet by Holly Black and Cassandra Clare is available for checkout from the Mission Viejo Library.