To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee

This novel, published in 1960 by Harper Lee, deserves every ounce of fame it has thus far received. Although the subjects that are addressed by the novel are shrouded by controversy, it addressed issues that needed to be addressed, such as racism and the crimes that can be committed under its name.

The novel is told from the perspective of six-year-old Caucasian Jean Louise “Scout” Finch. Her father, Atticus Finch, is the most reliable lawyer in her town, Maycomb. He takes on a case defending a black man who is wrongfully accused of raping a white woman, and this sends the entire population of their town into a frenzy. Scout and her brother, Jem, experience the metaphorical splitting of the town as everyone takes a side. They are attacked and harassed for the actions of their father.

The plot deepens and thickens, unfolding with an uncanny message: racism is a real issue, and it remains as such, even though To Kill A Mockingbird was first published in 1960. In fact, Scout and Jem are attacked at night and nearly killed in retaliation of their father’s case. The town is violently over-involved in Atticus Finch’s case, and most of its citizens actually attend the trial for sport and entertainment. People are quick to take sides and are adamant and passionate about whichever one they end up on.

To Kill A Mockingbird is also semi-autobiographical- Scout’s childhood is based loosely off of Harper Lee’s. However, Lee quickly became reclusive due to her book’s fame and all the attention it received. The novel was groundbreaking, but Harper Lee hardly did any interviews, book signings, or any public event of the sort. In fact, Harper Lee was barely involved in the making of the movie adaption of the novel, which became a box-office hit (it made over three times its budget!).

Overall, To Kill A Mockingbird is a magnificent literary tapestry, with intricately woven characters and artfully spun plots and subplots. It addresses issues that were relevant in its time and, some may argue, even more, relevant today. It is a novel that has affected people’s lives, in ways that are clear but also subconscious, and has educated many on the subject of racism amid the early 1930s.

-Arushi S.

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is available for checkout from the Mission Viejo Library. It can also be downloaded for free from Overdrive

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Image result for to kill a mockingbird book cover

Published in 1960 and never forgotten since, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird is a dramatic coming-of-age tale about a small Southern town poisoned by prejudice during the 1930s, only about half a century after the end of the Civil War.

Told through the eyes of eight-year-old Scout Finch, this novel appears to merely be the story of a small-town girl, but if one observes carefully and makes connections, one will discover the twisting and turning threads of racial segregation lying just underneath the surface. Atticus Finch, Scout’s father and a man who believes that justice is blind, faces the most dangerous trial of his life when he attempts to defend a black man, Tom Robinson, from a rape charge.

In the background of all this, however, is a quaint depiction of Maycomb, a tiny village at the heart of Maycomb County. The reader watches Scout Finch grow from a young tomboy to a slightly older tomboy, as she loses her innocence in the face of the hate brought on by racial prejudice.

All in all, To Kill a Mockingbird is the kind of book that will stay with the reader long after they have finished it. Combining delightfully accurate prose with an undercurrent mocking the idea of segregation, this novel is an extraordinary one, pulling any and all readers into its pages and holding them there from the very first page to the very last word.

-Mahak M.

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is available for checkout from the Mission Viejo Library. It can also be downloaded for free from Overdrive

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson

Typically, I don’t enjoy reading nonfiction. I’d rather immerse myself in a fictional world and befriend imaginary characters. However, Bryan Stevenson (a renowned lawyer), really blew me away with his work Just Mercy.

In this book, he recounts many of the cases him and his nonprofit organization, EJI (the Equal Justice Initiative), have taken on. His work focuses on the injustices and flaws of our country’s justice system, such as the death penalty, incarceration and the juvenile justice system. The book’s plot is centered around the case of Walter McMillian, a black man falsely accused of a murder he didn’t commit and placed on death row, but includes a number of other cases Stevenson took on. Throughout the book, Walter McMillian’s conviction is totally turned around and Stevenson describes the long, difficult fight to free a black man in Alabama.

Stevenson represented a wide variety of victims, including women and children. Along the way, he includes many facts and statistics about the cruel, seemingly unconstitutional or immoral rulings and laws passed in the 1800s-2000s. These facts surprised, outraged and educated me. He discusses how white judges and law enforcement officials in southern America did everything in their power to oppress African Americans, how children were subject to unforgiving punishments and how these injustices didn’t only hurt these individuals, but everyone around them.

Stevenson does an excellent job incorporating his own emotions and thoughts into nonfictional accounts. By doing so, Stevenson makes his work interesting and easy to follow. However, the book is an emotionally taxing read. He discusses cases and victims that suffered horrendous abuse, mental illnesses and punishments. There were times I had to put the book down and I would be in a state of disbelief or sorrow.

The autobiographical work is heartbreaking, yet encouraging. It is motivating to know that there are people like Stevenson who work to defend helpless victims against the power of the State and country. It is empowering because now, I feel more aware and educated about the country I live in and its response to crime. It’s an important read, especially for young people. I definitely recommend this book to everyone because of how eye-opening and powerful it is.

-Jessica T.

Just Mercy is available for checkout from the Mission Viejo Library. It can also be downloaded for free from Overdrive